ASIE

UNESCO-CLASSIFIED UMBROPHILIC TROPICAL FORESTS OF SUMATRA

ป่า ฝน เขต ร้อน เกาะ สุมาตรา

This week, the thirty-fifth session of the UNESCO World Heritage Committee was held in Paris. At the end of this, twenty-five new sites were inscribed as World Heritage. On the list is the Sumatran Rainforest Heritage Site. There are now nine hundred and thirty-six sites classified as world heritage.

The Sumatran Rainforest Heritage Site is located in the north of the island. It covers nearly three million hectares and includes three nature reserves: Bukit Baristan Selatan, Gunung Leuser and Kerinci Seblat. This territory is a real treasure for the long-term preservation of plant and animal life.

The protected area is home to tens of thousands of species of plants, more than two hundred species of mammals and nearly six hundred species of birds. Among mammals, twenty-two species are uniquely Asian, and they are not found anywhere else in the Indonesian archipelago. Finally, fifteen of the species recorded live only in Indonesia, such as the endemic orangutan of Sumatra.

UNESCO-CLASSIFIED UMBROPHILIC TROPICAL FORESTS OF SUMATRA


THE BARISAN SELATAN BUKIT
The Bukit Barisan Selatan Park, all in length, is three hundred and fifty kilometers long and forty-five kilometers wide and is located to the south. The highest peak in the park is Gunung Pulung (1964 meters). Dozens of rivers run through the area, as well as several lakes and hot springs. As tourist infrastructure is limited within the reserve, visitors generally choose to get there via organized tours.

THE GUNUNG LEUSER
Gunung Leuser National Park, in the north of the island, stretches over one hundred and fifty kilometers long and more than one hundred kilometers wide, in a mountainous region where the Gunung Kerinci (3,805 meters), highest peak in Sumatra culminates. and highest volcano in Indonesia. Populated by urangutans, elephants, tigers and other endangered species, it receives very few visitors.

UNESCO-CLASSIFIED UMBROPHILIC TROPICAL FORESTS OF SUMATRA

THE KERINCI SEBLAT
Kerinci Seblat, to the west, covers fifteen thousand square kilometers of primary equatorial forest. Not very accessible and with a rich flora and fauna, it is one of the last strongholds of endangered species such as the Sumatran rhinoceros. The park receives few visitors. Nevertheless, it is possible to go hiking in the north of it. However, on condition that you obtain a permit and go with a guide. It is in this region that the Gunung Tujuh is located, a magnificent lake formed in a crater and perched at an altitude of almost two thousand meters; it is the highest lake in Southeast Asia.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *